Mer Bleu Bog

boardwalk
Over the boardwalk

  1. Mer Bleu Bog is the remains of ancient rivers turned into peat moss, some 5 meters thick and accumulating for 8000 years.
  2. P9170403
    For Peat’s sake.

  3. Search for peat moss and you turn up links on mining it! Here’s a beautiful thing. Let’s kill it and burn it. Didn’t we already learn that lesson in Ireland? It’s in a weird position of being protected ecosystem, until we raid its resources, much like Algonquin Park, trumpeted as wild and free, while being logged. Humans are weird.

    Since 1971 with the Ramsar convention started in Iran and signed by 168 nations, there has been recognition of this area as one of a few (just over 2000) of the world’s unique unique wetlands.

  4. P9170408
    Hovering around the fungus.

  5. How amazing that timing was. A shutter-click later they had flown off from wherever they came from.
  6. The bird calls and lack of traffic sound percolating in, only wind in the grasses and trees made for a restful spot. It’s been too long since we were here last but you can’t get there by city bus, and it would make for an awfully long cycle. We tacked on the sidetrip to a car rental and took a wonderful break time.
  7. P9170382
    Open as dreams

  8. It takes a lot of space to breathe.

    The 8600 acres conversation area has areas of sandbar islands (with chainlink around trees because there are beavers) and open water areas and open areas of bog that resemble the area in the James Bay Basin.

  9. It also has area houses with signs saying “Dump the Dump Now”. How close is the plan to put a regional dump near the conservation area?

    Evidence of people in the information signs and walkway are more welcome than the air traffic. Surely there must be a way to make engines quiet and our impact less big.

  10. P9170389
    Buddy larches.

  11. The larch is one of the few needle trees that is also deciduous
  12. . Cedars and pines thin out and redden to a degree over winter but the larch, or tamarack, goes completely bald.

    P9170412
    Turn the other seed

  13. The berries are changing in the shorter days but the sky was entirely blue. The last time we were at Mer Bleu just at the second last curve of the boardwalk, it clouded over suddenly and started to rain.
  14. P9170405 P9170406P9170430 P9170379
    The ferns are heading into fall and the puffs on grasses in the shadow of cattails are catching autumn’s light.

  15. That upper right corner picture is cotton grass again, in case you were wondering.
  16. Funny how some march over the boardwalk in a timed powerwalk as if they were in any mall and others chat in a church-voice hush, while others use their outdoor voice as if they were at a ballgame. But mostly, there are few people.
  17. P9170384
    White birch in the direction of the train whistle

    P9170370 Curly Dock

  18. I’m not sure what the plant on the left is. Dad taught me the one on the right is called Indian tobacco. No one else seems to use that name for it. It’s a variety of Curly Dock. Some species are native, some not. They are poisonous to sheep, cattle and chickens, but humans can digest them. “When compared to spinach, curly dock has “… 1/3 more protein, iron, calcium, potassium, beta carotene and phosphorus.” [source]
  19. As a little kid I collected it up when it turned browner than that fern above, darker than an old penny, and rolled it in maple leaves and smoked it. The smoke was sweet and amusing but I didn’t get the point I didn’t think.
  20. This was to be Wordless Wednesday but given all the words, maybe we’ll bump it to Thursday 13 instead.
  21. Larch
    Leave you in the larch again.

Quote: ““Democracy is not just the right to vote, it is the right to live in dignity.” ― Naomi Klein

 
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